Jeffrey J. Heller, D.O.

511 N. Clyde Morris Blvd,
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
790 Dunlawton Ave., Suite H
Port Orange, FL 32127

(386) 239-8700

Posts for tag: moles

By Heller Dermatology Center
June 08, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: moles   Skin Cancer  

skin cancer moleIf you’re at a higher risk of skin diseases like melanoma or carcinoma, it’s important that you watch the moles on your skin. Abnormal cells can grow inside of moles, even if they’ve been fine for many years. If a mole suddenly starts changing in appearance, schedule an urgent checkup with a Port Orange and Daytona Beach, FL, dermatologist at the Heller Dermatology Center.

About Moles
Moles, sometimes called birthmarks, are small groupings of cells that look different from the rest of the skin. They can be dark colored or reddish in appearance. Some are slightly raised while others are flush with the skin. Some moles are present since birth (congenital), some appear in the adolescent years, and others show up later in life. Virtually everyone has at least one mole and most people have anywhere from 10 to 40 in various places.

Mole Concerns
Most moles are harmless and don’t need constant monitoring, but some need special attention, especially when a patient is at a higher risk of skin cancer. A normal mole will remain unchanged in appearance and is painless. Some moles slowly disappear with time. But when a mole begins to increase in size, change colors, or feel painful, that is a cause for concern. It’s a sign that the cells, called melanocytes, may be changing abnormally. An urgent skin exam by your Port Orange and Daytona Beach dermatologist should be the next step. 

What to Watch For
Dermatologists use an acronym called “ABCDE” to determine if a mole may be abnormal. Here is what to check for:

- Asymmetry (meaning that if you drew a line down the center, one side would not look like the other).
- Border irregularities (the edges of the mole look strange or undefined)
- Color changes or differences (a normal mole is one color).
- Diameter (a mole should not grow in size, which is why it’s wise to measure its diameter regularly).
- Evolving (one mole that evolves in any other way, including crusting, itching, or bleeding).

Is It Time for a Skin Checkup? 
Your Port Orange and Daytona Beach, FL, dermatologist will confirm if a mole needs special attention. It’s up to you to schedule a checkup at the first sign of a potential issue. Call (386) 239-8700 today to schedule a skin appointment with Dr. Jeffrey Heller at the Heller Dermatology Center.

By Heller Dermatology Center
May 04, 2018
Category: Dermatology
Tags: moles   Skin Cancer  

It’s important to recognize the warning signs that a mole might be cancerous.moles

Whether you spent years lathering on suntan oil and lounging in the sun or your family has a history of melanoma, it’s important to be aware of risk factors that could increase your chances of developing skin cancer. Furthermore, you should also take time to really get to know your skin so if changes do arise that you can immediately turn to our Daytona Beach and Port Orange, FL, dermatologist, Dr. Jeffrey Heller, for care.

So, what are the warning signs that a mole might be taking a turn toward skin cancer?

It’s important that you are examining your own skin about once a month to look for suspicious moles or growth. If you are regularly performing self-skin exams you are going to be more likely to detect issues right away when problems are easier to treat. Even though you’ll want to pay the most attention to areas of the body that are more likely to be exposed to the sun like the head, face, arms and hands it’s still important to examine every area of your body (even in places you wouldn’t expect like your scalp or between your toes).

When examining your skin it’s important to remember your ABCDEs. If you notice a mole that has any of these warning signs then it’s important to call our Daytona Beach and Port Orange skin doctor right away:

  • Asymmetry: If one side of the mole is a different shape or size than the other side (draw an imaginary line down the center of the mole. Both sides should be even in shape and size)
  • Border: The mole has a blurry, uneven or poorly defined border
  • Color: The mole contains multiple colors or different shades of brown, black, white, or red
  • Diameter: The mole is bigger than the eraser end of a pencil
  • Evolving: Your mole is changing color, shape or size over time (healthy moles should stay relatively the same and shouldn’t change)

Of course, if you do have a suspicious mole that is displaying one of these issues this doesn’t necessarily mean that you might have melanoma. In fact, sometimes melanoma doesn’t follow these rules at all, which is why you should schedule a skin cancer screening once a year just to play it safe. Even those with little to no risk factors for skin cancer should still get screened.

If in doubt, don’t hesitate to turn to our dedicated and caring dermatological team for the care your skin deserves. We offer locations in Daytona Beach and Port Orange, FL, to serve you better. Schedule your skin cancer screening today!

By Heller Dermatology Center
March 23, 2017
Category: Dermatology
Tags: moles   Skin Cancer  

Are you concerned about a change in a mole? Dr. Jeffrey Heller in Port Orange and Daytona Beach, FL, explains what to look for and molesexplains how mole changes can affect your health.

Is it just my imagination?

If you're like most people, you probably don't spend too much time looking at your moles and may second guess yourself if you do happen to spot changes. Unfortunately, failing to see a dermatologist if you notice a difference in a mole is a bad idea. Mole changes can be a sign that you have a potentially deadly form of skin cancer called melanoma. Monthly self-exams can help you easily spot signs of trouble.

What types of changes could signal a problem?

Any of these changes could indicate that you have a melanoma:

  • Color Changes: Has your mole changed from brown to black, red or another color?
  • Size: Is your mole bigger than a pencil eraser?
  • Changing Borders: Are the edges of the mole rough, irregular or blurred?
  • Unusual Shape: Is your mole any other shape than round or has it increased in height?
  • Texture: Has the mole suddenly become bumpy or is there another type of texture change?
  • Dryness: Is the surface of the mole dry or flaky?
  • Pain and Bleeding: Does the mole hurt or ooze blood or fluids?
  • Itching: Is your mole itchy?
  • Inflammation: Does the skin around the mole look red or swollen?

What's the next step if I notice a problem mole?

If you're concerned about a mole, call Dr. Heller's Port Orange or Daytona Beach office to schedule an appointment. Suspicious moles are generally removed and biopsied to determine if cancerous cells are present. Keep in mind that a change in a mole doesn't necessarily mean that it's cancerous. If you do have melanoma, you will need surgery to ensure that no cancer cells remain in your skin.

Skin cancer surgery used to cause significant scarring, in some cases. Today, skin doctors can often use less destructive Moh's surgery. The surgery preserves healthy tissue and reduces scarring because it removes skin one layer at a time.

Any change in a mole should be examined as soon as possible. Call Dr. Heller at (386) 239-8700 to schedule an appointment in his Port Orange or Daytona Beach, FL, offices.

By Heller Dermatology Center
May 27, 2016
Category: Dermatology
Tags: moles  

As the weather gets warmer and trips to the pool and beach become more frequent, many peoples’ priorities are fun in the sun. In all molesthe excitement, the sun’s harmful rays may be the last thing on your mind. However, protecting your skin this summer is crucial to your health and the prevention of skin cancer. Learn more about identifying skin cancer with help from your Daytona Beach, FL dermatologist at Heller Dermatology Center.

Identifying Irregular Moles
If caught early, skin cancer is a treatable condition with a high cure rate. However, learning to identify irregular moles is crucial to cancer treatments’ success. Potentially cancerous moles have certain qualities which make them different from normal moles. If you have a mole with one or more irregular features, you should schedule an appointment with your Daytona Beach dermatologist as soon as possible. To make identifying abnormal moles easier, follow the ABCDEs:

  • Asymmetry: Normal moles are round or ovular in shape. Moles which do not follow these general shapes may be cause for concern.
  • Border: A normal mole has a smooth border. Your dermatologist should examine moles which have jagged or irregular borders.
  • Color: Moles which are very dark brown or black or which have more than one color within their border could be cancerous.
  • Diameter: Most benign moles are smaller than the size of a pencil eraser. As a rule of thumb, moles should be no more than 6 millimeters in diameter.
  • Evolving: Benign moles normally do not change shape or color. Moles which appear to evolve, especially over a short period of time, are a sign of skin cancer.

Preventing Skin Cancer
Warmer weather usually means more exposed skin. However, taking the proper steps to protect your skin is key in preventing skin cancer. Always use a broad-spectrum sunblock with at least 30 SPF on any exposed skin. Try to avoid the sun’s rays when they are strongest during the middle part of the day. Wear a wide-brimmed hat to keep the sun’s rays off the face, UV-blocking sunglasses, and try to wear darkly-colored, tightly-stitched clothing. Additionally, be sure to see your dermatologist for regular skin examinations.

Have I always had this mole? 
Most cases of skin cancer present themselves as a new growth. If you have a new mole on your skin, it could be skin cancer. It is better to be safe than sorry, so if you question a mole’s appearance or notice a new mole, you should schedule an examination with your doctor.

For more information on spotting abnormal moles, please contact Dr. Jeffrey J. Heller at Heller Dermatology Center in Daytona Beach, FL. Call (386) 239-8700 to speak with an associate about scheduling your examination today!



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